Peak of Hurricane Season

Graph shows 100 year peak of named Tropical Cyclones & Hurricanes over Atlantic Basin courtesy of NHC

Graph shows Sep 10th as 100 year peak of named Tropical Cyclones & Hurricanes over Atlantic Basin courtesy of National Hurricane Center

September 10th marks the climatological peak of the Atlantic Basin Hurricane Season (based on documented tropical cyclones over a 100 year time period).  Despite today being the “peak” of the Season there has yet to be a 2013 hurricane in the Atlantic.  Currently, Humberto, a strong Tropical Storm west of the Cape Verde Islands, has the best chance of any this Season to make the jump in status, and it’s very possible it will intensify into a hurricane later today.  The 2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season has been very slow to this point mostly due to large areas of atmospheric sinking motion inhibiting storm development and creating large regions of dry air evaporating many tropical cyclones.

Inf/200-hPa Velocity Potential Analysis from Climate Prediction Center: top image from late Aug & bottom from Sep 9

Inf/200-hPa Velocity Potential Analysis from Climate Prediction Center: top image from late Aug & bottom from Sep 9

This past week it appears the large-scale sinking motion has subsided over the Atlantic Basin.  The atmosphere has responded to the more favorable environment as the Atlantic exploded with activity.  For the first time this year two tropical storms, Gabrielle and Humberto, exist simultaneously over the Atlantic.

Atlantic Inf Satellite Loop courtesy of NHC: TS Gabrielle & Humberto

Atlantic Inf Satellite Loop courtesy of NHC: TS Gabrielle & Humberto

Courtesy of National Hurricane Center: shows satellite image with positions of Gabrielle, Humberto, & a tropical wave over western Caribbean

Courtesy of National Hurricane Center: sat image with positions of Gabrielle, Humberto, &  tropical wave over western Caribbean

Tropical Storm Gabrielle will most likely become extratropical soon, merge with a trough over the Northeast, and possibly it’s remnants will impact Nova Scotia or Newfoundland.  Tropical Storm Humberto might attain weak hurricane status over the next 24 hours and move into the open Central Atlantic.  The tropical wave over the western Caribbean is more interesting; storms have intensified over the past several hours and numerical forecast models are forecasting a centralized area of low pressure to develop.  If a low does develop it is forecast to move westward or maybe even northwest over the Yucatan Peninsula and then over the very warm waters of the Bay of Campeche.  It’s not out of the realm of possibility this wave may develop into a tropical cyclone over the next several days with a very slim chance of impacting northeast Mexico or South Texas.  At this time it’s too early to say whether the United States will be directly impacted by a hurricane this year, but it does appear the 2013 Season is becoming more active.

UPDATE (12pm 9/11/13):

The National Hurricane Center upgraded Humberto to a minimal Category 1 Hurricane at 5 AM AST on September 11, 2013.  This makes Humberto the 2nd latest 1st hurricane of the Atlantic Season to form since the beginning of the satellite era.

Visible Satellite image of CAT 1 Hurricane Humberto Courtesy of NOAA

Visible Satellite image of CAT 1 Hurricane Humberto Courtesy of NOAA

 

2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season

Fortunately for many along the Atlantic Coastline the 2013 Hurricane Season has been relatively slow.  As of August 28th there have been 6 Named Storms in the Atlantic Basin.  All have been Tropical Storms, weak and questionable tropical storms.  Andrea was arguably a weak “subtropical storm”, probably not a true tropical storm.  Juston and I chased Andrea as it passed over Florida and Georgia in June and found it difficult to find a breeze in the core rain bands as the storm came onshore. We documented a tornado from a supercell in a band moving over Southeast Georgia far from the core of the system, but from our observations and analysis of the available data it appeared Andrea was most likely subtropical.

Barry, Chantal, and Dorian were barely tropical depressions and it would be easy to argue whether they reached Tropical Storm strength.  Erin and Dorian briefly had more robust appearances on satellite, but only enough to maybe estimate them to have briefly attained minimum tropical storm status.  Fernand developed quickly from a cluster of thunderstorms in the Bay of Campeche, but it’s difficult to say whether it was able to intensify into a tropical storm before it moved over the Mexican Coast.  With exception of Andrea (most likely subtropical) all the 2013 Named Storms were barely on the threshold of Tropical Storm status and perished quickly due to high wind shear, dry air, land, or all three.

Below are a few satellite images of some of 2013 tropical systems:

Satellite image of T.S. Andrea more indicative of a subtropical storm

Satellite image of T.S. Andrea more indicative of a subtropical storm

Dry air, wind shear, & land made organizing difficult for T.S. Barry

Dry air, wind shear, & land made organizing difficult for T.S. Barry

Dry air & wind shear obliterated T.S. Chantal's updrafts

Dry air & wind shear obliterated T.S. Chantal’s updrafts

T.S. Dorian didn't stand a chance against dry air & high wind shear

T.S. Dorian didn’t stand a chance against dry air & high wind shear

So far the Atlantic Basin has remained mostly unfavorable for the development of Tropical Cyclones.  Large areas of high wind shear has ripped apart many possible tropical systems this summer.  A Tropical Cyclone is vertically stacked, meaning the system is very similar from the surface to thousands of feet up into the mid-levels of the atmosphere. Wind shear can offset the vertical balance of a tropical cyclone causing it to weaken or dissipate.

Large swaths of deep dry air masses have been evaporating storms.  Individual storm updrafts need moisture and heat to strengthen and propagate.  Tropical cyclones are comprised of a vast amount of individual storm updrafts generating an incredible amount of heat (from latent heat release as water vapor condenses into cloud water droplets in storm updrafts).  This heat generates the low pressure at the center of a tropical cyclone.  Large quantities of dry air can evaporate storm updrafts, which causes evaporational cooling as cloud droplets become water vapor again.  This cooling combined with the loss of storm updrafts can weaken or kill a tropical cyclone.  Large-scale global sinking motion affecting the Atlantic Basin has created dry air masses, and large dry dust storms blowing off of Western Saharan Africa has, also, contributed to the dry Atlantic air.

The 2013 Atlantic Hurricane Season is still young and the sea surface temperatures are very warm.  Plenty of time and energy to generate an active Hurricane Season and it only takes one strong cyclone making landfall to cause a major disaster.  People living along the Atlantic Coast should to utilize these “quiet days” to prepare, create or revisit a hurricane disaster plan.

“Storm Riders” Top Ten

Currently in Hurricane Season mode, but the Atlantic Basin is quiet. Below I’ve posted possibly the top ten best photographs Juston Drake and I shot during the filming of the Television Series “Storm Riders” on The Weather Channel.  I say “possibly” because there are so many great photographs it’s very hard to chose the best.  The selection process involved many types of photos, but that was becoming too difficult, so narrowed it down to just tornadoes to make the process easier.  The Campo CO tornado was the only tornado to appear twice, because this tornado was so photogenic and had so many different amazing shots.

long rope tornado southwest of Russell KS on May 25 2012

long rope tornado southwest of Russell KS        May 25 2012

violent multivortex killer tornado near Alden MN on June 17 2010 caused EF4 rated damage to farms

violent multivortex killer tornado near Alden MN on June 17 2010 caused EF4 rated damage

large wedge tornado near Clarks Grove MN on June 17 2010

large wedge tornado near Clarks Grove MN on June 17 2010

strong cone shaped tornado west of Aurora NE on June 17 2009

strong cone shaped tornado west of Aurora NE on June 17 2009

snake-like rope tornado over I-40 near Dale OK on May 24 2011

snake-like rope tornado over I-40 near Dale OK on May 24 2011

violent multivortex cone tornado southwest of Henryville IN on March 2 2012

violent multivortex cone tornado southwest of Henryville IN on March 2 2012

large cone tornado tears through Devine TX on March 19 2012

large cone tornado tears through Devine TX on March 19 2012

2 tornadoes west of Cherokee OK on April 14 2012

two tornadoes west of Cherokee OK on April 14 2012

smooth tip of rope tornado over High Plains prairie south of Campo CO on May 31 2010

smooth tip of rope tornado over High Plains prairie south of Campo CO on May 31 2010

stovepipe tornado south of Campo CO on May 31 2010

stovepipe tornado south of Campo CO                 May 31 2010

2013 Spring Recap: May 15-June 21

On May 14th I posted several images representing our (Juston Drake and I) Spring 2013 chases up till that day.  The following day, May 15th, we documented a large tornado East of Ringold, TX.  The period of significant severe weather activity over the Great Plains the following two weeks, May 15-31, surpassed all other days from the Spring of 2013 combined.  Several substantial tornadoes developed on May 18 near Rozel, KS including a tornado rated EF4 by mobile radar data.  An outbreak occurred over Central Oklahoma on May 19, which included two violent tornadoes affecting the towns of Carney and Shawnee.  The following day we documented a violent and deadly tornado with damage rated EF5 over Moore, OK.  The following week continued to be very active with several significant severe weather and tornado days topped by possibly the most intense tornado ever documented near El Reno, OK on May 31st, which tragically took the lives of several storm chasers and other victims.

The large-scale global pattern during the early-mid Spring of 2013 was not conducive for severe weather.  However, a powerful MJO wave developed over the Indian Ocean during the first two weeks of May and propagated eastward, which significantly changed the pattern over North America.  A long-term drought over the Southwest United States provided a substantial temperature inversion, which played a significant role in several strong tornado days.  The significant temperature inversion (CAP) present near 700mb on May 18, 19, 20, 28, and 31 combined with very deep moisture, relatively cool upper-level temperatures and strong deep-layer shear provided environments for powerful tornadoes.  The environments, which developed on May 19th and 31st were especially volatile and conducive for powerful violent tornadoes with near-storm estimated effective-layer EHI’s approximately 12-18 and 18-23 respectively (values calculated by Juston Drake and Simon Brewer).  Had the Shawnee or the El Reno tornadoes moved over heavily populated neighborhoods catastrophic damage would have likely resulted.  Luckily these two tornadoes passed over relatively less populated areas, which minimized their impact.

Below are several images from May 15th through June 14th:

Violent Multivortex Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

Violent Multivortex Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

massive wall cloud and deadly wedge-shaped Moore OK EF5 tornado hidden underneath May 20 2013

massive wall cloud and deadly wedge-shaped Moore OK EF5 tornado hidden underneath
May 20 2013

Meteorologist & Storm Chaser Jim Bishop films Rozel KS EF4 Tornado May 18 2013

Meteorologist & Storm Chaser Jim Bishop films Rozel KS EF4 Tornado May 18 2013

Skinny Multivortex Tornado over Edmond OK May 19 2013

Skinny Multivortex Tornado over Edmond OK May 19 2013

World Record 2.6 mile wide EF5 El Reno "Mega-Wedge" Tornado in Multivortex Stage  May 31 2013

World Record 2.6 mile wide EF5 El Reno      “Mega-Wedge” Tornado in Multivortex Stage
May 31 2013

Horizontal Vortex Visible on bottom left of Violent Shawnee OK Tornado May 19 2013

Horizontal Vortex Visible on bottom left of Violent Shawnee OK Tornado May 19 2013

Gargantuan Shelf Cloud looms over Prescott AR  May 21 2013

Gargantuan Shelf Cloud looms over Prescott AR
May 21 2013

Violent Multivortex Wedge Tornado Southwest of Carney OK May 19 2013

Violent Multivortex Wedge Tornado Southwest of Carney OK May 19 2013

Huge Supercell Updraft Base, Wall Cloud, and Violent Tornado  West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

Huge Supercell Updraft Base, Wall Cloud, and Violent Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

Large Bowl Funnel with Multivortex Tornado Crosses Highway 82 East of Ringold TX May 15 2013

Large Bowl Funnel with Multivortex Tornado Crosses Highway 82 East of Ringold TX
May 15 2013

Crushed Vehicle & Heavily Damaged Moore Medical Center from May 20th EF5 Tornado

Crushed Vehicle & Heavily Damaged Moore Medical Center from May 20th EF5 Tornado

Violent Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

Violent Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

"Mega-Wedge" EF5 Tornado takes shape south of El Reno OK May 31 2013

“Mega-Wedge” EF5 Tornado takes shape south of El Reno OK May 31 2013

Stratus Undulatus Clouds over Norman OK morning before chase day  May 23 2013

Stratus Undulatus Clouds over Norman OK morning before chase day
May 23 2013

Powerful Inflow Jets Feeding Violent Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

Powerful Inflow Jets Feeding Violent Tornado West of Shawnee OK
May 19 2013

Large Cone Tornado East of Ringold TX May 15 2013

Large Cone Tornado East of Ringold TX
May 15 2013

Large EF4 Tornado Churns over Fields near Rozel KS May 18 2013

Large EF4 Tornado Churns over Fields near Rozel KS May 18 2013

World Record 2.6 Mile-Wide EF5 Tornado Southeast of El Reno OK at Maximum Size

World Record 2.6 Mile-Wide EF5 Tornado Southeast of El Reno OK at Maximum Size

Powerflash Illuminates Violent Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

Powerflash Illuminates Violent Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

Low Precip Supercell over Nebraska Panhandle  June 11 2013

Low Precip Supercell over Nebraska Panhandle
June 11 2013

Tornado Ropes-out East of Ringold TX May 15 2013

Tornado Ropes-out East of Ringold TX               May 15 2013

Incredible Supercell Structure looking South at early Multivortex Stage of El Reno EF5 Tornado May 31 2013

Incredible Supercell Structure looking South at early Multivortex Stage of El Reno EF5 Tornado May 31 2013

Violent Stovepipe-Shaped Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

Violent Stovepipe-Shaped Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

"Fly Saucer" LP Supercell hovers near Ansley NE  May 26 2013

“Flying Saucer” LP Supercell hovers near Ansley NE May 26 2013

Large Tornado Southwest of Carney OK May 19 2013

Large Tornado Southwest of Carney OK             May 19 2013

Rain-Wrapped Tornado West of Wapanucka OK May 20 2013

Rain-Wrapped Tornado West of Wapanucka OK May 20 2013

Ray of Light over open Prairie of Nebraska Panhandle June 11 2013

Ray of Light over open Prairie of Nebraska Panhandle June 11 2013

Sculpted HP Supercell near West Point NE June 14 2013

Sculpted HP Supercell near West Point NE       June 14 2013

Large EF4 Tornado Crosses Road by Storm Chasers near Rozel KS May 18 2013

Large EF4 Tornado Crosses Road by Storm Chasers near Rozel KS May 18 2013

Neighborhood Obliterated by EF5 Moore OK Tornado May 20 2013

Neighborhood Obliterated by EF5 Moore OK Tornado May 20 2013

Large Wall Cloud & "Mega-Wedge" approaching I-40 near El Reno OK May 31 2013

Large Wall Cloud & “Mega-Wedge” approaching I-40 near El Reno OK May 31 2013

Ghostly Shelf Cloud associated with strong MCS near Prescott AR May 21 2013

Ghostly Shelf Cloud associated with strong MCS near Prescott AR May 21 2013

Violent Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

Violent Tornado West of Shawnee OK May 19 2013

May 31 2013 El Reno OK EF5 Historic Tornado

EF5 tornado at it's maximum new world record width of 2.6 miles south of El Reno OK

EF5 tornado at it’s maximum new world record width of 2.6 miles south of El Reno OK

May 31, 2013 a very unstable rarely seen environment developed over Central Oklahoma and yielded a large and extremely violent tornado near the city of El Reno. The tornado expanded to a maximum width of 2.6 miles in diameter making it the largest tornado ever recorded breaking the old record width of 2.5 miles by the Hallam, NE tornado on May 22, 2004. A research mobile radar measured very high wind speeds very near to the surface, which may be higher than the maximum recorded mobile radar wind measurement from the infamous May 3, 1999 Bridgecreek/Moore F5 tornado.  Data is still being analyzed, so as of this writing all data is preliminary.

Unfortunately, this monster “mega-wedge” tornado, also became the first known to directly cause the fatalities of storm chasers in the act of chasing. Tim and Paul Samaras, and Carl Young (team TWISTEX chasing in the same vehicle) and another chaser, Richard Henderson, were engulfed by the tornado south of El Reno as it rapidly expanded/intensified. Tim Samaras was a very well disciplined veteran storm chaser/researcher respected and loved by many in the chaser community. It was a shock to many fellow chasers when he and his team perished in this tornado. It’s probably no coincidence the largest and possibly strongest tornado ever measured was also the first to cost the lives of storm chasers.

The supercell developed in an extremely volatile environment with local environment effective-layer EHI (Energy Helicity Index) values between 18-23 (calculations performed by Juston Drake and Simon Brewer), which is ridiculous considering many past violent tornadoes have occurred in environments approaching the 10 effective-layer EHI value. EHI values are derived by a combination of environmental CAPE (energy) analysis and Helicity analysis (shear). The tornado and parent supercell were able to fully take advantage of the extreme atmosphere in Central Oklahoma and literally “blow up” south of El Reno becoming a figurative black hole causing everyone including storm chasers to run for their lives.

Juston Drake and I were part of this event/tragedy. We followed/reported/documented the storm from Southwest of Calumet to our place of refuge at Will Rogers International Airport in Oklahoma City. We documented the birth of the El Reno storm and tornado near the Interstate 40 Corridor and eventually raced away from the massive tornado as it approached our location east of El Reno. We were hit by a weak satellite vortex, which developed along the RFD Gust Front/primary inflow band intersection as we repositioned east of the tornado. Eventually, we became trapped in two areas of significant traffic congestion on the Southwest side of Oklahoma City as the El Reno supercell bore down on our location.  We made a great decision to drive into the OKC airport parking garage and safely document the storm as it passed with a second large tornado nearby. We’ll eventually produce a detailed report on our observations from this historic event. One thing is for certain, we’ll never forget this day.

2013 Spring Recap: Mar-May 14

Severe weather hit the South hard in February of 2013, but since has been scarce.  The large scale North American pattern is to blame; persistent troughing in the East with persistent ridging in the West.  This pattern is probably the most effective at limiting severe weather for the United States.  We expected this pattern to be persistent through most of the Spring of 2013 from our successful late February forecast, so as Juston and I hit the road to find dramatic weather our journey became a struggle.

We found ourselves chasing an early May snowstorm east of Kansas City, and minor Mississippi River flooding near Memphis.  Big supercells and especially tornadoes were very rare.  We’ve managed to document 3 tornadoes so far this Spring; 2 in Northeast Colorado and 1 in Southwest Oklahoma.  Supercells were more common, but they were typically weak and relatively short lived, elevated, or outflow dominant.  We managed to get large hail on a few occasions even losing our back window and windshield to 4+ inch diameter hail in South Texas.  Strong CAPs, veered southwesterly low-level flow weakened dryline boundaries and mixed-out low-level moisture, poor deep-layer shear, and powerful cold fronts have dominated many possible severe weather setups, which are all expected from this type of large scale pattern.

The pattern appears to be changing, for how long is uncertain, but widespread severe weather events may by affecting the Plains and Eastern United States from Late May through Early June.  Tornadoes and large long-track destructive supercells will probably become more common over the upcoming weeks.  We’ll continue to document and report the severe weather as we have all Spring, but the intensity and amount of severe weather will most likely dramatically increase.

Below are a few photos we’ve taken so far this year:

IMG_7001 copy IMG_7022 copy IMG_7028 copy IMG_7042 copy IMG_7073 copy IMG_7118 copy IMG_7761 copy IMG_7779 copy IMG_7790 copy IMG_7794 copy IMG_7797 copy IMG_7876 copy IMG_7887 copy

IMG_7891 copy

IMG_7910 copy IMG_7929 copy IMG_7981 copy IMG_8009 copy IMG_20130509_201043_535 copy

New Episodes of “Storm Riders” on The Weather Channel

Storm_Riders_Logo%20copyLARGE

Monday begins Tornado Week on The Weather Channel and new episodes of “Storm Riders” will air Tuesday April 30 8pm EDT/7pm CDT. Reruns of the new “Storm Riders” episodes will air Thursday May 2 8pm EDT/7pm CDT and Friday May 3 8pm EDT/7pm CDT.

Link for Tornado Week on The Weather Channel

“Storm Riders” is produced by NBC Peacock Productions and airs on The Weather Channel. The show features meteorologists and storm chasers, Simon Brewer and Juston Drake, as they criss cross North America in search of monster storms and extreme weather using their weather expertise. The only drama in this show comes from the intense and deadly weather events they experience and document with a passion unmatched on television. Brave NBC Peacock Producers and Shooters ride along with Simon and Juston showing the world what it’s like to be in the heart of the most intense weather on the planet.

The new episodes of “Storm Riders” are from the fourth season of the series shot during the Spring of 2012. The series began shooting on June 12, 2009 with most of the First Season shot by a lone Produce and Shooter, Erin McGarry, during the last 2 weeks of June. Season 2 was much more exciting covering the very active Spring of 2010. Season 3 was very intense covering many strong and deadly tornadoes from the violent Spring of 2011. Two hurricanes, Hurricanes Bill and Irene, as well as a devastating ice storm over West Oklahoma were covered during the “Storm Riders” series. Many notable storms and tornadoes did not make the cut during the four year production of the “Storm Riders” Series. Dr. Greg Forbes joined Simon and Juston for several days in June of 2010 highlighted by large destructive hail, a weak tornado in South Dakota, and a direct hit by a rain-wrapped tornado associated with a bookend vortex on the north end of a bow-line segment thunderstorm.

Notable Images from the New Fourth Season of “Storm Riders”

IMG_1606 copy

IMG_1694 copy

IMG_1931 copy

IMG_7508 copy

IMG_7974 copy

IMG_8178 copy

IMG_8656 copy

IMG_9025 copy

IMG_9104 copy

Active Severe Weather Pattern

The March of 2013 weather pattern for the United States was dominated by persistent upper-level troughing in the East and ridging in the West.  This pattern was conducive for veered low-level flow associated with troughs entering over the Great Plains and dry/cool to cold airmasses being forced into the eastern United States and Gulf of Mexico.  The airmasses cooled and modified the, usually, moist low-level airmass over the Gulf.  The modified airmasses over the Gulf became significantly drier and provided very little moisture for troughs entering over the Great Plains.  Veered 850mb winds associated with each Great Plains trough in this pattern combined with the lack of deep unmodified Gulf moisture to create less than marginal severe weather setups.  Troughs exiting the Great Plains were able to access deeper Gulf moisture producing most severe weather episodes in the Southeast.

During the month of April 2013 the pattern has changed slightly.  A western trough has developed along with an eastern ridge.  This is typically a classic severe weather pattern for the United States allowing for a steady flow of deep Gulf of Mexico moisture to become intertwined with powerful Spring troughs entering the Great Plains.  But, there is a significant drought still affecting the Southwest United States pumping a strong inversion layer known as the CAP over the Plains.  Also, each trough still has trouble with cool to cold dry airmasses plowing through the northern and western High Plains.  The low-level wind field of each trough has also become quite veered due to persistent Great Lakes troughing, so each potential event has not produced widespread severe weather. 

The pattern continues April 15-18 with potential severe weather events from the Great Plains to the Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee River Valleys:

Monday (April 15) setup appears to be focused over eastern Oklahoma, southern Missouri, and Arkansas near a stalled cold front boundary.  The CAP appears to be very strong and significant upper-level lift may be too far away for surface-based storms to develop. 

Tuesday (April 16) appears to have potential once again along a stalled cold front boundary, but this time near the Red River region of Oklahoma and Texas.  Upper-level lift may be too far to the West and the CAP will be strong, so surface-based storm may not fire until well after dark. 

Wednesday (April 17) has more substantial severe weather potential, but the combination of night and morning precipitation might drive the retreating warm front southward as an outflow enhanced cold front.  The CAP might not be a significant problem on this day and might actually help keep convection isolated.  There is both potential for a significant severe weather outbreak and a big precipitation mess on this day.

Thursday (April 18) appears to have the greatest potential for a significant widespread severe weather outbreak.  A very powerful negatively-tilted trough appears to be progressing eastward over the Plains and affecting the Mississippi and Ohio River Valleys.  A large region may be affected by a deep moist subtropical airmass under a highly sheered environment conducive for tornadic supercell thunderstorms from Lousiana to Indiana.  A surging cold front in western Missouri and Arkansas will most likely cause a squall line of thunderstorms to develop, while more widespread isolated supercells might fire over the warm sector from northern Louisiana to Indiana and Illinois. 

The pattern will change once again as this trough passes into the eastern United States. 

Breaking Ground

Jim Bishop and I began Stormgasm.com with the intent to share our experiences with the world.  The website has tranformed as we have evolved as meteorologists and storm chasers.  We have expanded our adventures and experiences beyond the atmosphere to wilderness, volcanoes, earthquakes, and the cosmos.  Earth Storm is now another avenue to help share our experiences and understanding of Nature’s most powerful and amazing forces.